The Cardinal

Black Mirror: Review

Kathe Minchaca, Staff Writer

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






Spoiler alert if you are watching the Netflix original series, Black Mirror, season three.

The Netflix original, Black Mirror, has been a hit since 2011 by receiving a 96% on Rotten Tomatoes and now with the new season, has supplied us with many new episodes to binge watch. If you have not watched a single episode give it a try by watching at least one episode, and if you don’t have access to Netflix, just get the free month trial.

The reason the show is so unique is because the people have created each episode with many perspectives in which technology can ruin our future. They supply different versions of the type of technological advances that are accepted in that particular society. For instance, the first episode of season three, Nosedive, is my favorite one because it’s remarkably close to the way we judge people. In this episode, everyone is ranked from 0-5 and if your above a 4.5 you are eligible to be have anything granted to you by being popular, gaining respect, and overall getting a better lifestyle for yourself. Every single time the people in this society interacts with one another they have to rate them based on the conversation from 1 to 5 stars and the score can either bring your overall rate up or down.

The main character finally is able to realize how unfair the scoring is and that a person’s value isn’t corresponding to a specific number and finally rebels and faces the consequences of not being liked by society and earns a lower score. She begins to do anything she wants after being introduced to a truck driver that told her the story of her husband that had cancer and they didn’t assist him because there was another person with the same case that had a 4.5 rating.

In conclusion, technology has advanced so quickly in the past years with systems that you are attached to 24/7.  Apps are able to access your location and listen to your conversations is something we have put all our trust into, which is the message that the creators are trying to convey.  While technology may seem like a lifesaver at first, we should not trust it for every aspect.

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

About the Writer
Kathe Minchaca, Staff Writer
Kathe Minchaca is a senior and is apart of the advisory board for the Academy of Information Technology She’s also part of JROTC and has commanded an Un-armed drill team to represent Hoover. Since age 11, she has had a passion for music and learned to play the drums. Over the years she has invested...
Navigate Right
Navigate Left
  • Black Mirror: Review

    Arts & Entertainment

    #WEARECITYHEIGHTS

  • Black Mirror: Review

    Arts & Entertainment

    A Night to Remember

  • Black Mirror: Review

    Culture

    “Slavery Was A Choice”

  • Black Mirror: Review

    Asian Pacific American Heritage Month

    Chef Tina Luu

  • Black Mirror: Review

    Asian Pacific American Heritage Month

    Sung Kang

  • Black Mirror: Review

    Asian Pacific American Heritage Month

    Brenda Song

  • Black Mirror: Review

    Arts & Entertainment

    Clay Expressions

  • Black Mirror: Review

    Asian Pacific American Heritage Month

    Brandon Lee

  • Black Mirror: Review

    Asian Pacific American Heritage Month

    Don Ho

  • Black Mirror: Review

    Asian Pacific American Heritage Month

    Yuri Kochiyama

The student news site of Hoover High School
Black Mirror: Review